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Posts Tagged ‘Fiction’

Why Read? An Interview With Mark Edmundson

In Academia, American Literature, Arts & Letters, Books, British Literature, Creativity, Fiction, Historicism, History, Humanities, liberal arts, Literary Theory & Criticism, Literature, Pedagogy, Philosophy, Rhetoric, Scholarship, Teaching, The Academy, The Novel, Western Civilization, Western Philosophy on October 5, 2016 at 6:45 am

In the following C-SPAN Booknotes interview, Mark Edmundson of the University of Virginia discusses books, readings, the liberal arts, and more.

10 Literary Lawyers We Wish Were Real

In Arts & Letters, Fiction, Film, Humanities, Law, Law-and-Literature, Television, Wallace Stevens on February 22, 2012 at 8:10 am

Allen Mendenhall

A reader of this site has emailed me to point out a post at Criminaljusticedegreesguide.com.  The post, available here, is titled, “10 Literary Lawyers We Wish Were Real.”  Here’s the list:

1.  Atticus Finch

2.  Rudy Baylor

3.  Perry Mason

4.  Portia as Balthazar

5.  Joel Litvinoff

6.  Horace Rumpole

7.  The Man of Law

8.  Wallace Stevens (a strange selection indeed, since Stevens was real, but the author has put an interesting twist on Stevens)

9.  Henry Drummond

10.  Jake Brigance

Readers should view the article to see why the (unnamed) author believes that these figures “should be real.”

 

National Novel Writing Month

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Creativity, Fiction, Humanities, Literature, News and Current Events, News Release, Novels, Writing on October 27, 2011 at 3:28 pm

Allen Mendenhall

Readers of this site should know that November is National Novel Writing Month.  Every year, in November, writers use nanowrimo.org to dash off a 50,000 word novel in just 30 days (the site doesn’t track November 31).  Please check out the site and, if you’re interested, participate in the madness.  Here are some related links:

1.  About NaNoWriMo

2.  How NaNoWriMo Works

3.  History of NaNoWriMo

Literature and the Economics of Liberty

In Arts & Letters, Austrian Economics, Book Reviews, Communication, E.M. Forster, Law-and-Literature, Libertarianism, Literary Theory & Criticism on February 5, 2011 at 10:53 pm

Allen Mendenhall

Recently Jeffrey Tucker, editorial vice president of the Ludwig Von Mises Institute, interviewed me about capitalism, the free market, and literature.  We discussed, among other things, Marxism in literature and humanities departments.  Just days later, a review titled “Marx’s Return” appeared in the London Review of Books.  That shows how relevant my interview was and is.  The interview is below:

25 Greatest Fictional Lawyers

In Arts & Letters, Film on August 2, 2010 at 8:07 am

The editors of the ABA Journal have asked readers to vote for their favorite fictional lawyer.  See here.  But there’s a catch: Atticus Finch is not in the running.  It seems that Mr. Finch would have been too obvious a winner.  Candidates in the running include Michael Clayton, Ally McBeal, Vincent “Vinny” Gambini, Paul Biegler, Rusty Sabich, and many more.

My vote is for Paul Biegler, the piano-playing protagonist of Anatomy of a Murder.  Jimmy Stewart stars as Biegler in this now-classic film based on the best-selling novel by the same name.  The Honorable John D. Voelker, writing under the pseudonym Robert Traver, published the novel in 1959.  In perhaps the most insightful line of the film, Beigler says, “As a lawyer I’ve had to learn that people aren’t just good or just bad.”

Innocent, by Scott Turow

In Arts & Letters, Book Reviews, Law-and-Literature on May 4, 2010 at 11:49 am

Reviews of Scott Turow’s new novel appear in The Wall Street Journal, The Seattle Times, The Chicago Tribune, and The New York Post.

Richard L. Hershatter, Attorney & Spy Novelist

In Arts & Letters, Law-and-Literature on May 4, 2010 at 11:41 am

On May 3, The Connecticut Law Tribune profiled Richard L. Hershatter, a retired, 86-year-old novelist.  The piece is available here.

Scott Turow’s new novel

In Arts & Letters, Book Reviews, Law-and-Literature on April 30, 2010 at 5:21 pm

Scott Martelle profiles Scott Turow in anticipation of Turow’s forthcoming novel, Innocent.  The article, which appeared in the L.A. Times, is available here.

Turow has penned eight works of fiction and two works of nonfiction.  He continues to practice law at Sonnenschein, Nath & Rosenthal, LLP, in Chicago.

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