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Posts Tagged ‘Alabama’

Alabama Constitution Symposium, Blackstone & Burke Center, Session Six

In Historicism, History, Humanities, Law on January 8, 2020 at 6:45 am

On October 30, 2019, the Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty hosted a symposium on Alabama’s six constitutions at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The event was funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF) and cosponsored by ADAH, AHF, and the Alabama Bicentennial Commission. This video features session six of the symposium. The speakers are Justice Tommy Bryan (Alabama Supreme Court), Professor Mike DeBoer (Faulkner University), and Mr. Timothy A. Lewis (Alabama Supreme Court and State Law Library).

Alabama Constitution Symposium, Blackstone & Burke Center, Session Five

In American History, Historicism, History, Humanities, Law on January 1, 2020 at 6:45 am

On October 30, 2019, the Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty hosted a symposium on Alabama’s six constitutions at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The event was funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF) and cosponsored by ADAH, AHF, and the Alabama Bicentennial Commission. This video features session five of the symposium. The speakers are Ms. Ashley Penhale (Alabama State Bar), Dr. J. Mills Thornton (University of Michigan), and Professor Susan Pace Hamill (University of Alabama).

Alabama Constitution Symposium, Blackstone & Burke Center, Session Four

In American History, Historicism, History, Humanities, Law on December 26, 2019 at 6:45 am

On October 30, 2019, the Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty hosted a symposium on Alabama’s six constitutions at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The event was funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF) and cosponsored by ADAH, AHF, and the Alabama Bicentennial Commission. This video features session four of the symposium. The speakers are Dr. Allen Mendenhall (Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law) and Mr. Julian D. Butler (Huntsville attorney and member of the boards of ADAH and AHF).

Alabama Constitution Symposium, Blackstone & Burke Center, Session Three

In American History, Historicism, History, Humanities, Law on December 18, 2019 at 6:45 am

On October 30, 2019, the Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty hosted a symposium on Alabama’s six constitutions at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The event was funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF) and cosponsored by ADAH, AHF, and the Alabama Bicentennial Commission. This video features session three of the symposium. The speakers are Dr. Allen Mendenhall (Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law), Judge W. Keith Watkins (United States District Court, Middle District of Alabama), and Chief Justice Brent E. Dickson (retired, Indiana Supreme Court).

Alabama Constitution Symposium, Blackstone & Burke Center, Session Two

In American History, Historicism, History, Humanities, Law on December 11, 2019 at 6:45 am

On October 30, 2019, the Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty hosted a symposium on Alabama’s six constitutions at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The event was funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF) and cosponsored by ADAH, AHF, and the Alabama Bicentennial Commission. This video features session two of the symposium. The speakers are Dean Charles Campbell (Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law), Dr. Richard Bailey (historian and author), and Dr. Steven Brown (Auburn University).

Alabama Constitution Symposium, Blackstone & Burke Center, Welcome and Session One

In American History, Historicism, History, Humanities, Law, Southern History on December 4, 2019 at 6:45 am

On October 30, 2019, the Blackstone & Burke Center for Law & Liberty hosted a symposium on Alabama’s six constitutions at the Alabama Department of Archives and History (ADAH). The event was funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation (AHF) and cosponsored by ADAH, AHF, and the Alabama Bicentennial Commission. This video features the welcome and session one of the symposium. The speakers for the welcome are Mr. Steve Murray (ADH), Mr. Armand DeKeyser (AHF), and Chief Justice Tom Parker (Alabama Supreme Court). The speakers for session one are Dr. Allen Mendenhall (Faulkner University Thomas Goode Jones School of Law, Blackstone & Burke Center) and Dr. R. Volney Riser (University of West Alabama).

Discussing Alabama’s Constitution

In American History, History, Law, Politics on November 20, 2019 at 6:45 am

What the new Carnegie classifications mean for Alabama universities

In Academia, Scholarship, The Academy on December 19, 2018 at 6:45 am

This article originally appeared here in the Alabama Political Reporter.

The new Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education is out. Once operated by the Carnegie Foundation, the so-called “Carnegie classifications” are now run by the School of Education at Indiana University.

The classifications are by university type or category: doctoral universities, master’s colleges and universities, baccalaureate colleges, baccalaureate / associate colleges, associate’s colleges, special focus institutions, and tribal universities. When you hear people refer to the coveted R-1 status, they’re referring to a sub-classification within the “doctoral universities” category, which until this year trifurcated into “highest research activity” (R-1), “higher research activity” (R-2), and “moderate research activity” (R-3).

Under this taxonomy, Auburn, Alabama, UAB, and UAH were classified as “Doctoral Universities,” whereas Troy, Samford, Faulkner, Montevallo, and Alabama State were classified as “Master’s Colleges & Universities.” Huntingdon, Stillman, Tuskegee, and Talladega were designated “Baccalaureate Colleges.”

The many universities in Alabama fall into different classifications.  I have mentioned only a few universities not to suggest favor or quality, but to illustrate the spectrum of classification possibilities.

Not long ago, I wrote that “Carnegie should drop the phrases ‘highest research activity,’ higher research activity,’ and ‘moderate research activity’ that accompany the R-1, R-2, and R-3 label because they are misleading: the Carnegie rankings do not measure research activity but research expenditure.” Carnegie has corrected this flaw to some extent, relabeling its R-1 and R-2 categories as “Very high research activity” and “High research activity,” respectively—thereby eliminating the “er” and “est” suffixes (in “higher” and “highest”) that indicated the comparative and superlative degree (i.e., that made certain universities sound better than others).

So where do Alabama universities fall in the new 2018 classifications?  

Auburn, Alabama, and UAB are the only Alabama universities in the R-1 category. UAH is an R-2. Troy, Faulkner, Montevallo, and Alabama State remain “Master’s Colleges & Universities.” Tuskegee entered that category. Samford is now classified under the heading “Doctoral / Professional Universities” that did not exist in earlier classifications. This category accounts for professional-practice degrees like juris doctorates or medical degrees.

Huntington, Stillman, and Talladega remain “Baccalaureate Colleges.”

If you’re curious about the classification of your alma mater or favorite Alabama university, you can search the listings here.

It would be a mistake to treat these classifications as a hierarchal ranking of quality.  They are, rather, descriptive differentiations that inform the public about the size and spending of universities. The only category in which universities receive something like a vertical ranking is “Doctoral Universities,” which tier universities according to their alleged “research activity.”

Eric Kelderman points out that “critics wonder whether going for more research money and a higher Carnegie classification really has more to do with elevating institutional image, and comes at the expense of academic quality—particularly for undergraduates.” This is a profound concern.

The Carnegie classifications could incentivize malinvestment in doctoral degrees and number of faculty members. The job market for humanities faculty is shrinking while the number of humanities doctorates is rising, but to achieve their desired Carnegie classifications, universities continue to churn out humanities Ph.Ds. who have diminishing chances of landing tenure-track positions.

The Carnegie classifications don’t measure research quality, either. One university could spend millions on research with negligible outcomes while another could spend little on research yet yield high-quality, groundbreaking scholarship.

The Carnegie classifications are not perfect, but they command attention among administrators in higher education and can involve public funds. For that reason alone, anyone who has a stake or interest in a university in Alabama should pay attention too.

Licensing Away Economic Prosperity

In Economics, Law, Libertarianism, Politics on March 21, 2018 at 6:45 am

This article originally appeared here in the Alabama Political Reporter. 

Do you want to alleviate poverty in Alabama? Do you want to curb the power of special interest groups over government agencies? Do you want more affordable goods and services in basic industries?  Do you want to help disadvantaged groups find good jobs and become productive citizens? Do you want to reduce the population of our overcrowded prisons?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you should read a new reportpublished by the Alabama Policy Institute titled “The Costs of Occupational Licensing in Alabama.” Coauthored by Daniel Smith (Troy University), Courtney Michaluk (Troy University), David Hall (Troy University), and Alex Kanode (George Mason University), the report details the effects of occupational licensure on our state.

What is occupational licensure? In short, it’s governmental regulation requiring people to obtain a license before entering into certain trades or fields. Sounds harmless, right? Aren’t these regulations in place to protect consumers from exploitation and inexpert practices? Such reasoning led to the rise in occupational licensure, which today extends to several zones of economic activity.

However well-meaning, occupational licensure has had unintended consequences on the people it’s designed to protect. Instead of helping average consumers, it lines the pockets of industries that have lobbied to regulate away entrepreneurial forces that drive down costs.

If you’re poor and trying to find low-skilled work as a barber, manicurist, eyebrow threader, hair stylist, school bus driver, or shampoo assistant, you must obtain a license first. This license may be prohibitively expensive because of renewal fees, coursework, continuing education, and so forth.

“Alabama licenses a total of 151 occupations,” according to the report, “covering over 432,000 Alabama workers, which represents over 21 percent of the labor force.” Think about that: more than two of every 10 people working in Alabama need a license to do what they do for a living. Licensing boards governing admission standards and prerequisites can mandate expensive training and dues that don’t affect the quality of industry services.

Economists refer to occupational licensure as a barrier to entry. Barriers to entry ensure that those already within a profession or trade can raise prices to artificially high levels, in effect squeezing out competition by using the mechanisms of government to control the market.

Inflated prices harm low-income families who cannot afford to buy what they could have bought if the market had set prices based on natural supply and demand. Spouses of military service members often suffer from occupational licensure because, when they move from state to state, they must jump through hoops to enter the licensed profession in which they practiced in other jurisdictions.

Occupational licensure is, in short, a net burden on the economy, escalating prices, limiting consumer choice, and restricting economic mobility.  The API report estimates that the overall costs of occupational licensure in Alabama exceed $122 million. That’s a lot of money. What can be done to keep some of it in the hands of the ordinary people who need it most?

The report proposes five reforms for Alabama policymakers:

  1. “[T]hey can reform current procedures for extending occupational licensing to new occupations and mandate thorough review processes to ensure that licensing is not extended to new occupations without a demonstrable and severe threat to consumer safety that cannot be overcome with the market mechanisms, such as consumer or expert reviews, reputation, guarantees, or private certification, or the already existing government laws, such as those dealing with liability, fraud, misrepresentation, and false advertising.”
  2. “[T]hey can establish procedures to systematically review all licensure requirements for currently licensed occupations to ensure that they do not require unnecessary or excessive requirements or costs for licensure.
  3. “[T]hey can systematically review all currently licensed occupations to determine, individually, whether a demonstrable severe threat to consumer safety exists. If not, they can remove occupation licensing entirely for those occupations.”
  4. “[They] can explore licensure reforms that specifically target ex-offenders” to reduce the prison population and criminal recidivism.
  5. “[They] can … explore occupational licensing reform with military members and their families in mind.”

A short article cannot capture the nuance and particulars of the entire report; readers should view the report for themselves to make up their own minds.

During this time of partisan divide and political rancor, people of good faith on both the left and the right can agree that something needs to be done about occupational licensure. The problem cannot continue to grow. It presents a unique opportunity for Republican and Democratic lawmakers to come together to ease economic burdens on the people of Alabama. Let’s hope they seize it.

A Conversation Regarding Thomas Goode Jones

In America, American History, Books, History, Humanities, Law, liberal arts, Nineteenth-Century America, Politics, Scholarship, The South on November 8, 2017 at 6:45 am
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