Allen Porter Mendenhall

Archive for the ‘Arts & Letters’ Category

Five Poems by William Bernhardt

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Humanities, Literature, Poetry on May 27, 2015 at 8:45 am

William Bernhardt

William Bernhardt is the bestselling author of more than forty books, including the blockbuster Ben Kincaid series of novels, the historical novel Nemesis: The Final Case of Eliot Ness, currently being adapted into an NBC miniseries, a book of poetry (The White Bird), and a series of books on fiction writing. In addition, Bernhardt founded the Red Sneaker Writing Center, hosting writing workshops and small-group seminars and becoming one of the most in-demand writing instructors in the nation. His monthly eBlast, The Red Sneaker Writers Newsletter, reaches over twenty thousand people.

Scratches

This is how it begins:
scratches on signs, on blocks
on a white page. Then the
scratches start to dance. They
recombinate, they collect sounds
they call your name.
Like so much in childhood
they are ciphers, full of secrets
but once you learn the dance
the mysteries of this world
and more, are revealed.
You learn to read.

You learn:
manners from Goldilocks
curiosity from George
gluttony from Peter
nonsense from Alice.
You set sail with Jim Hawkins, raft with Huck
And row with Mole.
Love is eternal, Catherine tells you
But so is madness, says the first Mrs. Rochester.
Jeeves helps you laugh
poetry helps you cry
Atticus shows you how to do both, with courage.

Not only have the scratches shaped the world
they have shaped your world.
They have taught you how to see.
Now you need never be afraid.

Now you will never be alone.
In the darkest night
in the deepest solitude
The scratches will call to you.
You will open the covers.
They will reach out their arms and say,
You thought you were the only one?

 

AIB 13

I was prepared for the Awkward Age
the physical changes, personality,
frustration, exasperation, even rage—
but not for this.

I was prepared to smile knowingly, thinking
This too shall pass.
And we will always love each other, I tell myself
as much as it is possible to love anyone
right?

You are in your room, alone, with a book.
Who showed you how to read?
Seemed like a good idea at the time.
My questions are greeted with
monosyllabic replies, grunts,
eye rolls, withering glares, sarcasm—
the lowest form of human discourse—
and finally the screaming:
Why can’t you just leave me alone?

Here’s why:
I still remember reading you Charlotte’s Web
taking you for long walks in the rain
through the San Juan Mountains
hand-in-hand
watching you sneak downstairs after bedtime
so we could watch Buffy the Vampire Slayer
coming to the choir loft
midway through the service
so you could sit on my lap.

The Awkward Age is supposed to be
awkward for you, not me. I should
be the parent
but instead I’m a marionette
with tangled strings, a poor sap trapped
in Shelob’s web
and you are the elusive hummingbird
who hovers in midair for a short time
and then skitters away
faster than my eye can follow.

 

Baden-Baden

As it turns out, the Black Forest
looks nothing like Black Forest cake.
And the gambling resort town of Baden-Baden
looks nothing like Las Vegas, thank God.
Men do not wear shorts in the casino,
hairy legs shouting, “Show me the eight!”
The only sex shop—Erotik World—is discretely tucked away on a
Side street,
not advertised on a video monitor larger than the state of Rhode
Island.
And there is not a Starbucks on every corner.
Yet.

The others in my group say this is just like an American resort town,
a tourist trap, which snares the unsuspecting
with offers of soft ice cream and bottled water
that will restore your youth.
But they are wrong.
Where is the venture capitalist
as proud of his swelling belly
as he is of his adolescent wife
with her high-pitched giggle, blonde ringlets, and denim-short-
shorts?
Where are the other captains of industry,
the ladies of the evening?
Where is the young father with the baby carrier on his back?
or the mother herding her enormous go-forth-and-multiply brood
the sullen teenager clutching a skateboard
the elderly couple holding hands as they return to the KOA
Kampground
the high roller who is secretly
a middle-management operations officer at a cardboard box factory
the alcoholic artist
the Elvis impersonator?

It feels good to get away from what is familiar
to force yourself into a new environment
to think new thoughts in new places,
I muse, as I sit at a table in the ice cream café
recalling the life I left behind
and the faces
and wondering if there is really any difference
as I wait for the rest of the group to arrive
at the Baden-Baden McDonald’s.

 

Paulette

We hover throughout dinner
a witty bon mot, a quotation
from the sonnets, a well-told
anecdote
pelicans skimming the surface
of the water
but never touching it.

 

Dinah and Me

My cat hates my girlfriend
and the one before her, and the one
before her. She crouches on the carpet
stalking with evil emerald eyes
the usurper who has claimed what is hers,
the attention, the affection,
the lap she warms while I work,
her side of the sofa.

Perhaps this is why they never last.
Who could feel at ease
with the furry wrath
bearing down upon them, the sculpted brow
and sanded tongue, watching, marshaling
her eldritch incantations
to wrest the interloping gluts from
her side of the sofa.

One never hears of Casanova’s cat.
Romeo brought no feline fury to that fateful balcony.

Perhaps it’s not the cat.
Could be the charred chicken piccata I cook
determined that this time I will get it right
or the gold-plated Scrabble set,
the giant portrait of the kids on the hearth,
the Judy Garland records—
or something else entirely.
I prefer to think it’s the cat.

And late at night
when the children are tucked in and sleeping safely
and the house is lonesome with silence
and I have barricaded myself with
a hot cup of green tea, a puzzle,
a book on the bedside,
and the long tendrils of the sycamore tree
scratch at my window pane
I am grateful for the rumbling goddess
keeping watch on my shoulder.

Amiga do Peito

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Fiction, Humanities, Literature on May 20, 2015 at 8:45 am

Hugo Santos

Hugo Santos é professor de Literatura no Brasil e possui os cursos de Graduação e Mestrado em Literatura Brasileira, ambos conseguidos pela Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, no estado de Pernambuco, cuja capital é Recife – sua cidade natal (e de acordo com ele mesmo, uma das mais belas cidades do país). Atualmente, ele está frequentando o Programa de Doutorado em Educação de Adultos, na Universidade de Auburn, onde também é professor de Língua Portuguesa e Cultura Brasileira. Além disso, ele está representando o Governo de Pernambuco na iniciativa de se estabelecer uma parceria entre a UA e a Universidade do Estado de Pernambuco, através do estabelecimento, troca e ampliação de pesquisas que permitirão a alunos e professores das duas instituições explorarem o que cada uma tem para oferecer. É autor de “Um Céu Imenso.”

Hugo Santos is a Professor of Literature in Brazil and received both his undergraduate and master’s degree in Brazilian Literature from the Federal University of Pernambuco, in the state of Pernambuco, located in the Northeast of Brazil, whose capital is Recife—his hometown (according to himself, one of the most beautiful cities in the country). Currently, he is enrolled in the Ph.D. Program in Adult Education at Auburn University and teaches classes in Portuguese and Brazilian Culture. He is linked to the Auburn University Office of the International Programs as a representative of the Government of Pernambuco and is establishing a partnership between Auburn University and the Pernambuco State University, where he worked in Brazil. The research exchange and extension program enables the students and teachers of both institutions to explore what each university has to offer. He is the author of Um Céu Imenso (“An Immense Sky”).

 

– Ama?

– Claro, amor.

– Diga.

– O quê?

– Que ama.

– Amo você.

– O quanto?

– Quanto o quê, amorzinho?

– O quanto você me ama, oras.

– Muito.

– Muito, quanto?

– Muito mais que o muito.

– E até quando?

– Até quando?

– É. Até quando você me ama, ou vai me amar?

– Pra toda vida, amor.

– Essa e outras vidas?

– Olha, meu amor… que eu amo e por quem respiro, são três horas da madrugada, eu tô cansadíssimo, tenho que acordar cedo e não sei se vou conseguir desse jeito.

– Ah, Rafa… você sabe muito bem que eu sou insegura mesmo, e que pelo fato de eu ser tão apaixonada por você eu preciso confirmar isso sempre.

– E isso inclui o meio, exatamente o meio, da madrugada, Pati?

– Mas eu não tenho culpa se isso às vezes me aflige.

– E por que isso te aflige, amor?

– Pense comigo. Eu sou louca por você.

– Sei.

– E não me vejo longe de você.

– Entendo.

– Então… se o que você sentir por mim não for o mesmo, ou na mesma quantidade, ou na mesma intensidade, eu vou ficar vulnerável, né?

– Vulnerável?

– Totalmente vulnerável.

– Pati, meu amorzinho. Você andou falando com alguém, hoje?

– Eu?

– É. Você.

– Por que você está me perguntando isso?

– Porque, minha vida, eu conheço muito bem a mulher com quem eu estou casado há cinco anos. E ao longo desses sessenta meses, sempre que alguma das suas amigas fala com você um assunto mais polêmico, você simplesmente não dorme, como agora, e não sossega até me acordar no meio da noite, como hoje. Quem foi?

– Foi a Fabi.

– Ai, de novo não. Novamente a Fabi? E o que ela te falou dessa vez?

– Ela apenas me repassou. Foi algo que as meninas do trabalho comentaram ontem.

– E eu já to até imaginando. A Fabi tem um jeito todo especial de conseguir repassar coisas que foram comentadas pelos outros.

– Ah… mas isso não vem ao caso.

– Realmente não. Conta.

– Pois é. Ela me disse que as meninas comentaram, e você sabe muito bem que as meninas…

– Pati, não enrola. Fala direto.

– Ela me disse que hoje em dia os homens são extremamente claros naquilo que sentem; que eles falam muito pras mulheres o quanto as amam, e que não conseguem viver sem elas. Essas coisas.

– E baseada no quê, ela disse isso?

– É aí que entram as meninas. Como você sabe, elas são solteiras, estão sempre em contato com outras pessoas solteiras e têm visto que os homens com quem se relacionam são assim, carinhosos, atenciosos e falam sempre. Ela até acha que tem a ver com essa onda de metro-sexualismo e tudo.

– E onde é que eu entro nessa história toda?

– Pois é. Elas também comentaram que nunca vêem você falando.

– Elas nunca me vêem falando?

– É.

– Que eu amo você, e que sou louco por você, e tudo?

– Isso.

– E o que você acha disso?

– Eu? Bem… não sei ao certo, e é por isso que estamos conversando, não é não?

– Olha, Pati, embora metro-sexualismo não seja o meu forte, e na verdade eu sequer saberia dizer o que faz, como se veste e como fala um metro-sexual…

– Eu te dou umas dicas, amor…

– Não, não precisa. Posso continuar?

– Claro, amor.

– Meu amor, não vai ser a quantidade de vezes que eu diga o quanto a amo que vai dar qualidade ao que sinto por você. O meu amor é presente, é profundo, é cristalino e verdadeiro, e com toda certeza já existia há muito tempo, antes mesmo de nos conhecermos. Prova disso foi o meu olhar patético pra você, na primeira vez que te vi, dizendo pra mim mesmo “eu amo essa mulher desde sempre; eu sonhei com ela; eu torci por ela… eu vivi pra ela.”

– Oh, amor…

– É também possível, meu amor, que eu não esteja falando o suficiente pra você que te amo, mesmo porque, Pati, dizer-lhe isso a cada minuto, toda hora e todos os dias, ainda não atenderia o meu desejo e nem ao que você merece. Você que merece tanto, e que amo tanto. Saiba, entretanto, amorzinho, que vou buscar melhorar. Mas se, ainda assim, eu não parecer a essência do que seria um aplicado “metro”, eu ainda serei o mais apaixonado, o mais absolutamente devotado e o mais amavelmente entregue dos homens.

– Ai, amor. Isso foi tão lindo. Agora eu me sinto bem melhor.

– Jura?

– Juro.

– Vamos dormir, então?

– Vamos.

– Amo você. Muito.

– Também te amo, Rafa.

– Tá bom.

– Tá bom? Mas eu pensei que você fosse dizer “muito mais que o muito”…

– Boa noite, amor.

 

Caxito

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Fiction, Humanities, Literature on May 13, 2015 at 8:45 am

Hugo Santos

Hugo Santos é professor de Literatura no Brasil e possui os cursos de Graduação e Mestrado em Literatura Brasileira, ambos conseguidos pela Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, no estado de Pernambuco, cuja capital é Recife – sua cidade natal (e de acordo com ele mesmo, uma das mais belas cidades do país). Atualmente, ele está frequentando o Programa de Doutorado em Educação de Adultos, na Universidade de Auburn, onde também é professor de Língua Portuguesa e Cultura Brasileira. Além disso, ele está representando o Governo de Pernambuco na iniciativa de se estabelecer uma parceria entre a UA e a Universidade do Estado de Pernambuco, através do estabelecimento, troca e ampliação de pesquisas que permitirão a alunos e professores das duas instituições explorarem o que cada uma tem para oferecer. É autor de “Um Céu Imenso.”

Hugo Santos is a Professor of Literature in Brazil and received both his undergraduate and master’s degree in Brazilian Literature from the Federal University of Pernambuco, in the state of Pernambuco, located in the Northeast of Brazil, whose capital is Recife—his hometown (according to himself, one of the most beautiful cities in the country). Currently, he is enrolled in the Ph.D. Program in Adult Education at Auburn University and teaches classes in Portuguese and Brazilian Culture. He is linked to the Auburn University Office of the International Programs as a representative of the Government of Pernambuco and is establishing a partnership between Auburn University and the Pernambuco State University, where he worked in Brazil. The research exchange and extension program enables the students and teachers of both institutions to explore what each university has to offer. He is the author of Um Céu Imenso (“An Immense Sky”).

Se um dia me perguntarem o quanto o Caxito foi importante pra mim, a resposta vai ser rápida e sóbria, o que poderá parecer um sarcástico paradoxo, em função do que eu via naqueles dias – um reduto de conhecimentos. Posso até estar provocando sobressaltos e ressentimentos a toda ordem de pensadores ou intelectuais, porém, guardadas as proporções e respeitadas as comunidades que formaram grandes escritores, foi daquela fonte ali, daquele conjunto de coisas, do Caxito, que comecei a contrapor razões aos fatos, possibilidades à realidade e necessidades às perspectivas.

A essa altura, o leitor já deve estar se perguntando: “O que vem a ser esse tal de Caxito, afinal?”. Pois bem, trata-se de um bairro, mas não um bairro qualquer, é na realidade um grande conglomerado de pequenas coisas. Um conjunto inicialmente organizado de ruas, que vai sofrendo uma espécie de mutação sócio-habitacional-cultural e, ao final, toma uma forma pretensiosa de bairro. Lá, como poucos, tive a oportunidade de ver, na letargia de atitudes, nas expressões idiomáticas, nas feições frustradas e nos bêbados inveterados, que aquela junção toda provocava uma espécie de comoção geral, de comiseração geral, em cada um e em todos, gerando certa acomodação natural frente às dificuldades, o que, invariavelmente, como num ciclo vicioso, gerava mais letargia, frustração e embriaguez.

Dos amigos da époça, lembro de todos – pelo menos de seus apelidos: Vaíta, Mi, Biuzinho, Nino, Novo Grande, Leto, Berval, Van e Dilá, que eram, em grande parte, aprendizes daqueles moradores mais antigos, conhecidos por serem cheios de deliciosas estórias mentirosas, o que os endeusava diante daquela gente; João Bocão, João Boi, Coquilha, Gerson Coquinho, Cara de Prega, Beto Perneta e Ontôin Cotó poderiam estar inseridos em qualquer obra autoral, já que traduziam o estereótipo de personagens literários; Cremilda Doida, com seus acessos, freqüentemente era atendida por minha mãe, alvo preferido também de Ernestina, uma bêbada sorumbática que, em seus píncaros de porre, chegava graciosamente em nossa casa, às duas horas da madrugada, gritando: “Santinha, meu amoooor!”. Entretanto, de quem eu mais lembro, na verdade, é de Vado Pipa. Um ser absolutamente hilário – quando estava bêbado, claro – que exercia um certo fascínio na garotada, creio eu pelo fato daquele futuro tragicamente almejado, de tornarem-se também bêbados divertidos. Lembro, inclusive, uma ocasião quando retornava pra casa, com meu pai, e vi nosso personagem, com uma garrafa de cachaça, totalmente ébrio, fitar-nos e cantar.

– Seu Santos… ela me deixou e foi morar com o guarda. Ela me deixou e foi morar com o guarda…

Trôpego, ainda tentou equilibrar-se e bambamente estatelou-se na lama, entre risos e outras cantorias, no que aproveitamos pra sair dali. O mais risível, porém, aconteceu quase duas décadas depois, quando numa noite dessas levava minha mãe de volta pra casa onde morei, e exatamente no mesmo lugar, com uma garrafa na mão, vejo Vado Pipa, velho, resistente, indiferente… e que me cumprimenta, cantando.

– Ei, Hugo… meu bom… ela me deixou e foi morar com o guarda. Ela me deixou e foi morar com o guarda…

Sorri compulsivamente, deixei minha mãe e notei o que há tempos não tinha me dado conta – ali ainda era o Caxito.

Freqüentemente eu me perguntava o que atraia tanta gente àquela conversão de ruas, e não fosse uma explicação dada por João Bocão a meu pai, seguramente ainda teria as mesmas dúvidas. A conversa surgiu durante um “rasga-rasga” ocorrido uma única vez, na sede do Palmeiras Esporte Clube – única gafieira do bairro – e que se estendeu, rapidamente, a todas as ruas.

No Palmeiras, às sextas e sábados à noite, o que se via era uma verdadeira profusão de cores, luzes e cenas hilárias, transformando aquelas pessoas que nos pareciam normais, perecíveis, alcoólatras e conformadas, em personagens vigorosos, alegres e irreverentes. Era uma pena que minha mãe não me deixasse sequer chegar perto do clube nessas noites, por isso eu tinha de fazer verdadeiras manobras pra entrar na cozinha de casa, sair pela porta dos fundos, pular o muro de Dona Lídia, passar pelo terreiro de Dona Cotinha para, depois de aproveitar o descuido de Cara de Prega na portaria, ter meus quinze minutos de puro êxtase, vendo as carícias suadas, os beijos excitados, as mãos nos peitos e as danças frenéticas ao som do merengue, tempo suficiente pra retornar sem ser percebido, e pensar no que aquilo representava pra um menino de onze anos.

No carnaval de 1980, dentro do Palmeiras, ocorreu um episódio que representava bem esse misto de coisas novas e impensáveis – o rasga-rasga. Era a quarta-feira de cinzas, mas nem por isso a alegria bizarra daqueles foliões, travestidos daquilo que, melhor que ninguém, sabiam retratar, tendia a diminuir. E o interessante era ver que, enquanto em Olinda o último dia era visto como algo absolutamente natural, buscando estender aquelas horas restantes tão somente pelo sabor que elas tinham, sentindo a falta do sobe-desce das ladeiras, do frevo e do maracatu, no Caxito parecia uma obrigação comum a todos a extensão do último dia de festa, da última tarde que, indo embora, levaria também o cobertor ilusório de toda aquela banal realidade.

A certa altura, Beto Perneta, que ainda encontrava-se de pé por pura insistência, já que de longe se notava, pelo tanto que tinha bebido, não saber sequer onde estava, puxou Cremilda Doida pela Cintura, certamente querendo fazer parte do trenzinho em que ela estava, e num ato meio reflexivo ainda deu algumas passadas naquele cordão, mas como o trem corria em círculos, o pobre Beto não conseguiu parar suas pernas, de tamanhos diferentes, e quando escaparam-lhe as mãos – àquela altura já na bunda da Doida – só conseguiu segurar-lhe a saia, que veio com ele, cambaleando, topando, gritando e só não se ferindo na queda porque conseguiu agarrar-se na camisa de João Boi, que foi rasgada na aterrissagem. Ainda sentado, ileso, com a mão da camisa no peito e a mão da saia na cabeça, vendo Cremilda – o exemplo da calma – com a mão estendida, esperando a veste, Beto Perneta respirou fundo, olhos fechados e cara azeda.

-Êita, que é bacalhau puro!

A risadagem, claro, foi generalizada e Cremilda nem pensou muito, o que não era surpresa pra ninguém, e arrancou, rasgou e jogou pra todos os lados os pedaços da camisa de Beto Perneta.

O que se sucedeu foi uma verdadeira tendência de rasgadura geral. Via-se pai rasgando genro, neto rasgando sogra, primo rasgando nora, desconhecido rasgando conhecido. A tal ponto daquilo tudo ultrapassar as paredes do clube e se estender às ruas, onde quem quer que fosse passando virava uma nova vítima dos contumazes rasgadores – que àquela altura eram todos – independente da qualidade do tecido, cor, molde ou detalhe. Pessoas indo pra casa, fugindo da folia, indo ao trabalho, ao hospital, voltando, todos eram sumariamente agarrados e rasgados, de uma maneira que em determinada hora o que se via eram os corpos seminus, no máximo com suas cuecas, anáguas ou sutiãs descoloridos e surrados, sobre um tapete enorme de retalhos do que haviam usado e, assim como que em transe, rindo daquele encontro de alegria carnavalesca, debilidade e descompromisso com qualquer pudor.

Nessa hora, com meu pai, no terraço de nossa casa, de onde assistíamos a tudo, João Bocão se aproximou dizendo:

– Sei não, Seu Santos… ou endoidô tudo, ou tá tudo querendo endoidá.

E nessa hora, mesmo que involuntariamente, com seu trocadilho, João me deu a luz do que era o óbvio. Quem estava ali, não só naquela hora, mas quem vivia ali, alimentava-se ali e fantasiava seus dias ali, estava querendo de fato “endoidá”. Mas, endoidar para demonstrar que não eram só as mazelas que faziam parte de suas vidas, mas também os sonhos. Sonhos de alegria e esperança. Sonhos, sobretudo, por algo que em nenhum outro lugar, com tanta intensidade, eles iriam atingir – a liberdade de estarem ali; o sonho pelo despudor de rasgarem suas roupas, como quem arranca uma chaga do corpo, e de peito, coração e alma abertos, demonstrarem que sempre seriam maiores do que aquelas feridas.

Na manhã seguinte, ainda a olhar aquela espécie de campo de batalha de tecelões, Vado Pipa se aproximou de mim e num de seus acessos de lucidez – lógico que irremediavelmente raros, mas que nem por isso deixavam de ter a importância real em nossas impressões de mundo – comentou:

-Coisa linda, né?

– O que é lindo, Vado?

– Esses pedaços de roupas pelo chão. Olha lá a camisa de Nino, o meu filho; o calçãozinho de Pirrita, irmão de Getúlio… tem até a saia de Cremilda, ali ó…

O que me impressionava é que a cada peça, ou resto dela, havia uma identificação do dono e um fato pitoresco.

– Êita! Aquele sutiã ali eu conheço. Neide do Pão tava com ele na sexta-feira do carnaval, lembra? Tava de blusa branca, choveu e o biquinho do peito passava por esse buraquinho aqui. – Enfiando o dedo mínimo pelo orifício.

Nessa hora rimos bastante e eu fiquei deslumbrado com aquele sujeito pequeno, franzino e das pernas tortas, que conseguia ser tão preciso nas suas pequenas coisas e despertava um curioso sentimento de admiração em quem se colocava ao seu lado, estampando no rosto um sorriso de contentamento e realização por estar ali, sempre, todos os dias, transformando o comum em algo singular e especial.

– Sabe, Hugo, a gente precisa melhorar esse negócio. – Eu não entendi, mas Vado continuou.

– A gente precisa organizar melhor esse carnaval. Como é que esse povo brinca assim e joga a roupa em tudo quanto é lugar? Tudo bem que tá rasgada, mas poderiam jogar num lugar só, né não?

Os paradoxos eram corriqueiros no Caxito, e aquele momento se tratava de um deles. A grandeza de um pensamento humilde e a profunda e irretocável banalidade de sua existência. Aquelas pessoas me mostravam o quanto a sensibilidade, a delicadeza e a fatalidade poderiam fincar suas marcas em minhas memórias, fazendo-me refém de meus medos e, ao mesmo tempo, mostrando-me a beleza de que tudo aquilo o que é bom está ao nosso alcance.

Naquela hora, João Bocão se aproximou e foi logo fazendo seu comentário:

– Eu acho que vai chover, hoje…muito.

 

The Country Lawyer Explains

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Humanities, Poetry, Writing on May 6, 2015 at 8:45 am

Amy Susan Wilson

Amy Susan Wilson has published in numerous journals, including This Land, Southern Women’s Review, and elsewhere. Fetish and Other Stories, which focuses on Southern women, is forthcoming May 2015, Third Lung Press. She is Editor of Red Truck Review: A Journal of American Southern Literature and Culture and Publisher, Red Dirt Press. (www.redtruckreview.com). She publishes attorney Steven L. Parker’s debut novel, “BS,” release date of June 2015. 

“The Country Lawyer Explains”

Goat blood gushing
like Turner Falls
after a flood;
Rascal
your number one bird dog
settled into truck bed,
flip out the side
into that ravine,
fridges
sofas—
goats
thrown out back
the pull-trailer
Bethel Fork Road.
Seven necks
wishbone-easy
snap.
Ford 250 axle busted up
good as a boxer’s face.

Elmore charging outta his pen
as you chug the rut-red dirt
road—lying in wait he was–
Elmore
knowing to dart
just the right millisecond
to crash pancake-thin
Ford 250 and all,
Elmore’s
laugh-smirk-snort
the sure-fire sign
of a serial killer
you say.
Welp, Elmore enjoyed takin’ out
           meat goats,
           ole Rascal.
           Ya didn’t see him laugh;
           truck engine
           blazin’ Hades
           goat blood
           galore.

II.

Uncle Roy,
Aunt Wanella,
I don’t doubt
the Internet says
you can prosecute a pig
some parts the world
but not
Pottawatomie County,
Oklahoma.
Sure, blame our federal
government,
Obama,
But animals lack culpability.
I agree
smells like rain
come this hour.
Elmore’s gonna muck
in mud
sun his big fat
wad of belly,
his favorite
slaughter hog-thing
beyond murdering meat goats,
God’s finest bird dog,
the injustice
of reward.

Salto Alto

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Fiction, Humanities, Literature on April 29, 2015 at 8:45 am

Hugo Santos

Hugo Santos é professor de Literatura no Brasil e possui os cursos de Graduação e Mestrado em Literatura Brasileira, ambos conseguidos pela Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, no estado de Pernambuco, cuja capital é Recife – sua cidade natal (e de acordo com ele mesmo, uma das mais belas cidades do país). Atualmente, ele está frequentando o Programa de Doutorado em Educação de Adultos, na Universidade de Auburn, onde também é professor de Língua Portuguesa e Cultura Brasileira. Além disso, ele está representando o Governo de Pernambuco na iniciativa de se estabelecer uma parceria entre a UA e a Universidade do Estado de Pernambuco, através do estabelecimento, troca e ampliação de pesquisas que permitirão a alunos e professores das duas instituições explorarem o que cada uma tem para oferecer. É autor de “Um Céu Imenso.”

Hugo Santos is a Professor of Literature in Brazil and received both his undergraduate and master’s degree in Brazilian Literature from the Federal University of Pernambuco, in the state of Pernambuco, located in the Northeast of Brazil, whose capital is Recife—his hometown (according to himself, one of the most beautiful cities in the country). Currently, he is enrolled in the Ph.D. Program in Adult Education at Auburn University and teaches classes in Portuguese and Brazilian Culture. He is linked to the Auburn University Office of the International Programs as a representative of the Government of Pernambuco and is establishing a partnership between Auburn University and the Pernambuco State University, where he worked in Brazil. The research exchange and extension program enables the students and teachers of both institutions to explore what each university has to offer. He is the author of Um Céu Imenso (“An Immense Sky”).

– Realmente as lembranças são boas, mas você tem de reconhecer que nós chegamos a esse ponto graças às suas implicâncias.

– Implicâncias?! Meu querido… implicâncias são nada, diante dessa sua postura…dessa intransigência… desse machismo todo. Machismo, isso…é esse o termo.

– Agora você fala em machismo, Elvira, mas na época ficava toda dengosa dizendo “como me fortalece essa sua preocupação, benzinho”. Vê lá aquele cara, o dos óculos na boca, eu tenho certeza que ele tá dizendo pra ela que o decote tá muito escandaloso.

– Olha, Cuca, se ele tá falando algo a respeito do decote, é o que vai fazer com ele depois daqui. Não vê aquela cara?

– Cara de quê? De quê?

– Esquece. Poderia pegar outra taça pra mim, por favor?

– Pego, desde que você não me peça com esse jeitão de juíza de paz em audiência, afinal de contas, ainda não estamos separados.

– Cuquinha, anjo, pega uma tacinha pra mim, lindo?

– Você sempre usava “anjo” quando não tava legal ou queria brigar.

– Pega uma taça, pô!

– Então, Cuca, como estão as coisas? A Elvira tá linda hoje, heim?

– Uma diva por fora e uma centuriã por dentro. Só tá dando estocada, Marcão.

– É assim mesmo, rapaz. Você não viu quando eu me separei da Sandrinha? Todo santo dia era uma discussão… e à noite também.

– Só que a Sandrinha não passava na tua cara que você tinha estragado tudo. Pra falar a verdade, eu nem via vocês discutindo tanto.

– É… diferentemente da Ester, ela aceitou o desgaste da relação.

– E a Ester não tá aceitando?

– Ela não acredita em desgaste da relação, meu querido. Ela vê o término do casamento como o final inevitável de uma relação de interesses, mesmo que, no nosso caso, o interesse maior fosse apenas sexo. Toma esse chileno aqui.

– Não tinha o cabernet argentino que você gosta, mas esse chileno aqui é divino.

– Edvaldo Augusto… esse argentino a que você se refere foi quando nós começamos a namorar, e eu nem gostava de vinho na verdade.

– Tá vendo só? Eu me esforço, procuro ser um cara atencioso, e o que ganho sempre? Patada.

– Calma, Cuca. Lembre-se que estamos discutindo nossa relação.

– No aniversário da filha do nosso melhor amigo?

– Do seu melhor amigo. Ele deixou de ser o meu, quando terminou com a Sandrinha.

– Mas que barbaridade, Elvira. Você… uma mulher inteligente, moderna, que normalmente aceita os defeitos e decisões das pessoas, com esse preconceito ridículo.

– Você acha?

– Acho.

– Engraçado. Eu poderia jurar que sendo gêmeas univitelinas e tendo o Marcão começado com a Ester um mês depois que eles acabaram, isso já seria motivo suficiente.

– Olha quem tá chegando.

– Oi, pai.

– Filhinha. Cuca. Tô interrompendo alguma coisa?

– Imagina, seu Berto. A gente tava somente divagando sobre contingências de relação a dois.

– Especialmente quando essa relação a dois diz respeito a duas pessoas muito próximas, que nem estão tão próximas assim.

– Minha gente…faz trinta anos que eu e sua mãe decidimos não desgastar a relação com esse tipo de discussão.

– Mas vocês já estão separados há vinte anos.

– Isso não importa para o contexto. Mas pelo menos nos dez primeiros anos deu certo.

– É o que eu tento sempre dizer pra ela, seu Berto. Não adianta discutir o que pode ser tranqüilamente relevado.

– Acontece, Cuca, que a arte de relevar, tão eficientemente desempenhada por você, é exatamente o que agrava as coisas. Como agora, por exemplo.

– Agora? Qual exemplo? O que eu fiz?

– Você me trazendo aqui, na casa do “ex” da minha irmã, depois d’ele ter feito o que fez, achando tudo normal.

– Mas o que tem de errado numa separação e num novo casamento?

– Realmente não tem nada errado, minha filha.

– Ocorre que ele já traia a Sandrinha antes de separar, papai.

– Realmente tá errado, Cuca.

– E o pior é que esse aí sabia de tudo.

– Isso não é verdade, Elvira, eu apenas achava.

– Ah é? E quem foi que apresentou a Ester ao Marcão?

– Eu, como você sabe.

– Só não sabia que vocês já tinham namorado antes.

– Ela foi minha namorada aos treze anos, Elvira.

– O que é pior, porque esses sentimentos antigos nunca passam e nem são esquecidos.

– Nossa, Elvira, dessa vez você tá ultrapassando todas as possibilidades de imaginação fantasiosa.

– Uma imaginação que hoje tem uma filha aniversariando e não tira os olhos de você.

– Agora você exagerou. Tô me sentindo até ofendido com isso. Eu jamais teria alguma coisa com a mulher do meu melhor amigo.

– Minha filhinha… eu acho que você tá saindo do foco também.

– Se tem algo que eu não perdi foi o foco, papai. O foco nos olhos da Julianinha, verdes como os do Cuca; o foco no nariz, arrebitado feito o do Cuca, e até no jeitinho dela sorrir…exatamente como o do Cuca.

– Essa foi demais… uma filha com a Ester. A Julianinha ser minha filha é a coisa mais maluca que eu poderia ouvir nesses dez anos.

– Eu também.

– Papai…o senhor tem que ficar do meu lado.

– Bem, com licença, acho que meu celular tá vibrando. Filhinha. Cuca.

– E o que tá vibrando agora é a minha cabeça. Olha , Elvira, a gente se fala em casa. Pode ficar com o carro que eu pego um táxi.

– Isso. A consciência já tá pesando.

– Seu Berto, empresta o telefone?

 

Avelino

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Fiction, Humanities, Literature on April 15, 2015 at 8:45 am

Hugo Santos

Hugo Santos é professor de Literatura no Brasil e possui os cursos de Graduação e Mestrado em Literatura Brasileira, ambos conseguidos pela Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, no estado de Pernambuco, cuja capital é Recife – sua cidade natal (e de acordo com ele mesmo, uma das mais belas cidades do país). Atualmente, ele está frequentando o Programa de Doutorado em Educação de Adultos, na Universidade de Auburn, onde também é professor de Língua Portuguesa e Cultura Brasileira. Além disso, ele está representando o Governo de Pernambuco na iniciativa de se estabelecer uma parceria entre a UA e a Universidade do Estado de Pernambuco, através do estabelecimento, troca e ampliação de pesquisas que permitirão a alunos e professores das duas instituições explorarem o que cada uma tem para oferecer. É autor de “Um Céu Imenso.”

Hugo Santos is a Professor of Literature in Brazil and received both his undergraduate and master’s degree in Brazilian Literature from the Federal University of Pernambuco, in the state of Pernambuco, located in the Northeast of Brazil, whose capital is Recife—his hometown (according to himself, one of the most beautiful cities in the country). Currently, he is enrolled in the Ph.D. Program in Adult Education at Auburn University and teaches classes in Portuguese and Brazilian Culture. He is linked to the Auburn University Office of the International Programs as a representative of the Government of Pernambuco and is establishing a partnership between Auburn University and the Pernambuco State University, where he worked in Brazil. The research exchange and extension program enables the students and teachers of both institutions to explore what each university has to offer. He is the author of Um Céu Imenso (“An Immense Sky”).

Já fazia parte da rotina dele sentar-se no tronco em frente à casa, olhando aquela terra árida que não tinha cheiro de nada, contemplando uma estrada barrenta, sem outras casas além da dele e sem visões de um tempo bom e de boas lembranças.

A imersão naqueles pensamentos era diária, assim como eram diários os sonhos de uma vida sem aquele sofrimento todo. Não era nada físico. Ele nunca fora castigado pela mãe, que além de saber do empenho dele na organização dos plantios e no trato com os animais, reconhecia os valores de um filho bondoso e preocupado com os seus.

O sonho era o de deixar todo aquele cenário seco e sem vida, com uma sede eterna de tudo o que refrigera a alma e alenta um semblante entristecido. Dona Maria da Luz, a mãe, já tinha notado aquele olhar, e também já tinha imaginado que uma partida dele não era algo remoto, ao contrário, considerando que todos daquela idade já tinham partido dali, ficando apenas os mais velhos e as crianças. Ela sabia que isso era possível, mas rezava pra que não se concretizasse, afinal eram somente eles dois naquela casa, além da irmã menor, que por razões óbvias não daria conta de tantas responsabilidades naquele sítio.

Ele avaliava tudo e sabia bem o que representaria uma partida, deixando as duas com toda aquela carga de coisas, mas muito mais com a impressão de que ele estaria fugindo de algo que não poderia vencer. E de fato ele não conseguiria jamais. Como superar tanta seca, tanta fome, tanto sol, tanta solidão e abandono? Ele não conseguiria jamais. E além do mais, agora estava mais focado do que nunca, principalmente depois da conversa com José Pedro, amigo de infância, que retornara da capital e estava ali por aquelas bandas visitando parentes, e que também lhe fizera ver que a única alternativa era o êxodo, a saída, a fuga, se assim entendesse. Mas não uma retirada desesperada e sem propósito; não um rompimento com suas raízes e história, com sua família e passado. Seria uma saída estratégica, momentânea, apenas o tempo necessário para uma conquista de vida, de posses e de solidez, após o que retornaria e resgataria os que ficaram.

– Mas Zé… como eu poderia deixar minha mãe e minha irmã aqui, assim?

– Avelino, rapaz… ficando aqui é que você vai ajudar menos ainda, homem. Vai ficar nessa vida sofrida, sem esperança e sem futuro. Lá, pelo menos, você vai ter uma garantia, um emprego e uma moradia, até poder se arranjar sozinho.

Era algo em que ele não conseguia parar de pensar. Os últimos anos tinham sido duríssimos, sem perspectiva alguma do que pudesse trazer qualquer mudança, porém ele também sabia que havia algo além da sofreguidão. Havia uma certa sensação nostálgica em ser o arrimo da casa e a pessoa em cujos ombros pesavam todas as dependências. Era uma sensação incoerente, ele sabia. Como sabia também que coerência era um artigo extremamente raro naquele lugar, especialmente naqueles dias. E naquelas horas ele se sentia resoluto.

Partiu, enfim, na lua cheia de dezembro, querendo acreditar que olhando pra ela teria alguém com quem conversar e com quem se ressentir. Saiu enquanto todos dormiam, obedecendo ao que a mãe dissera, ela que não suportaria abraçá-lo na despedida e nem olhá-lo nos olhos pra desejar-lhe sorte. Nesse pedido, ele sabia bem, estavam todos os clamores calados e todos os choros contidos que lhe seriam ditos se ela o visse partir. Embora forte, a tez enrugada da velha sempre estremecia quando o assunto envolvia partidas, com os olhos lacrimejando e o olhar cabisbaixo, sem qualquer palavra, apenas soluços compassados e a respiração perturbada. Não era a primeira vez que ela passava por aquilo. O marido, muitos anos antes, tomara a mesma decisão, e com o mesmo ímpeto buscou uma fuga ensandecida, deixando todos aos cuidados de Dona Maria da Luz e de um futuro incerto, ou certo, já que, conforme ela previu, ele não mais voltou.

Agora, porém, o quadro era outro e a saída do filho soava como algo apocalíptico. Como, afinal, iriam sobreviver? Como suportariam, sem a força, a perseverança e a solicitude do jovem, àqueles tempos de penúria? Mas em momento algum qualquer palavra foi proferida. Nada foi dito. Nenhum lamento saiu dela, além do lamento de uma mãe pela perda do filho. Um filho que não voltaria, envolvido que seria por um mundo grotesco. Um mundo novo e feroz, que de tanto açoitar-lhe com maldade e sofrimento, apagaria de sua memória as lembranças de vida e os laços com o passado, e apagando o passado, apagaria o futuro delas.

E foi nesse embaço de coisas que ela levantou de manhã, sentando no tronco em que o filho sempre sentava e olhou aquele risco de nuvem que mais lembrava um galho de aveloz. Contemplando uma estrada barrenta e olhando aquela terra árida que não tinha cheiro de nada, ela sentiu que o sol estava mais quente do que de costume e o som do silêncio era ainda mais triste que outrora.

 

 

 

Um Céu Imenso

In Arts & Letters, Creative Writing, Fiction, Humanities, Literature on April 8, 2015 at 8:45 am

Hugo Santos

Hugo Santos é professor de Literatura no Brasil e possui os cursos de Graduação e Mestrado em Literatura Brasileira, ambos conseguidos pela Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, no estado de Pernambuco, cuja capital é Recife – sua cidade natal (e de acordo com ele mesmo, uma das mais belas cidades do país). Atualmente, ele está frequentando o Programa de Doutorado em Educação de Adultos, na Universidade de Auburn, onde também é professor de Língua Portuguesa e Cultura Brasileira. Além disso, ele está representando o Governo de Pernambuco na iniciativa de se estabelecer uma parceria entre a UA e a Universidade do Estado de Pernambuco, através do estabelecimento, troca e ampliação de pesquisas que permitirão a alunos e professores das duas instituições explorarem o que cada uma tem para oferecer. É autor de “Um Céu Imenso.”

Hugo Santos is a Professor of Literature in Brazil and received both his undergraduate and master’s degree in Brazilian Literature from the Federal University of Pernambuco, in the state of Pernambuco, located in the Northeast of Brazil, whose capital is Recife—his hometown (according to himself, one of the most beautiful cities in the country). Currently, he is enrolled in the Ph.D. Program in Adult Education at Auburn University and teaches classes in Portuguese and Brazilian Culture. He is linked to the Auburn University Office of the International Programs as a representative of the Government of Pernambuco and is establishing a partnership between Auburn University and the Pernambuco State University, where he worked in Brazil. The research exchange and extension program enables the students and teachers of both institutions to explore what each university has to offer. He is the author of Um Céu Imenso (“An Immense Sky”).

A cadeira se encontrava exatamente no mesmo local. As teias que a recobriam davam-lhe um contorno sutil, de modo que o quadro de abandono do quarto era encoberto por aquele manto prateado, luzindo ao abrir da janela e mantendo intocáveis as lembranças há muito guardadas de uma época de alegria, dor e tristeza.

Remanescendo de uma turva lembrança, que embora agora estranha, era ainda uma visão que me enternecia muito, vi tomarem forma as estantes de livros, a cortina cinza que combinava com aquela extensão de céu sempre chuvoso, e que me trazia, junto com as gotas, o toque mágico do horizonte, quando estendia o rosto pela janela e permitia à chuva desempenhar o papel de confidente e mensageira de uma embalada esperança. Senti a mesma brisa daquelas noites solitárias, daqueles momentos de intangível leveza, em que me sentia num vôo silencioso, rasgando ares sem fim e tendo a minha frente apenas o infinito, irretocável e belo, chamando-me a um mundo desconhecido do meu e a uma vida desconhecida da minha.

Senti o mesmo tremor no assoalho do quarto, de quando ouvia os passos na escada e num rasgo impetuoso de agonia gelava-me o sangue, sufocava-me o peito e eriçava-me o coração, num batimento louco arritmado, vendo surgir, gigantesco e enfurecido, a imagem de meu pai.

– Moleque! Eu disse que não queria você com aquela vadia.

– Ela não é vadia. Só está querendo me ajudar.

– Ajudar a tirar você dessa família, de junto dos seus irmãos.

Meu pai jamais imaginaria o que era estar ao lado da Dona Mariana. Impossível também para um menino de doze anos pensar nela como um ser humano normal. Impossível não ser hipnotizado por uma profunda sensação de êxtase quando a via, em qualquer que fosse o momento, especialmente no primeiro cumprimento do dia.

– Tudo bem, Vitinho? Hoje você parece muito mais encantador e sorridente do que da última vez. Andou ganhando algum presente?

– Não, senhora. Só tô feliz porque tô mesmo.

Hoje eu vejo, sentindo ainda o veludo daquela voz, que aquele jeito cândido, aquela beleza sublime de quem transpirava ternura, era única e simplesmente o que ela era. O seu tom e o seu toque, o rosto delineado lembrando a face do bem, e um sorriso angelical que irradiava pura compaixão, deixaram-me instintivamente apaixonado no primeiro segundo que a vi.

Eu a havia conhecido no mesmo dia em que minha mãe morrera. Ao ver-me chorando no corredor do hospital, sem jamais termos-nos falado antes, ela me deu um abraço afetuoso e alisando minha cabeça e limpando minhas lágrimas, teceu-me os mais belos comentários a respeito de minha mãe que ninguém jamais dissera. Citou frases que ela havia dito, pessoas que havia ajudado e fez-me ver, da maneira mais cristalina possível, que o fazer o bem era o valor mais inalienável que poderíamos ter e repassar.

Minha cabeça girava feito um carrossel. Muito mais pela apaixonante presença daquela diva, do que pelo enredo de dor pelo qual passava naquele dia. Na ocasião não entendi muito bem a iniciativa de Dona Mariana e perguntava-me, a todo momento, o que a movia a tamanho gesto.

Muito mais complicado era tentar entender a reação negativa de meu pai àquela amizade. A fúria que o tomava à simples citação do nome dela deixava-o de tal modo possesso que seus olhos esbugalhavam, a ponto das veias do globo ocular ficarem à vista, a veia da garganta inchar e, a cada berro, chuvas de saliva respingarem em quem o cercasse. Era completamente incompreensível tanta ira por alguém tão infinitamente amável como Dona Mariana.

De toda sorte, e por força de um impulso sempre incontido, jamais deixei de ir aos encontros com aquela minha musa. Apesar do medo das surras prometidas e do calafrio no momento do retorno pra casa, a necessidade de falar-lhe, de ouvir-lhe e de olhar-lhe se sobrepunha a quaisquer sentimentos humanamente conhecidos. O bombeamento do meu sangue aguçava toda a eletrização do meu corpo, e um misto de letargia e ligeireza, de estupidez e genialidade tomavam conta de minhas ações, gestos e sorrisos.

Como era de se esperar, um dia fiz-lhe referência ao ódio nutrido por meu pai, incluindo os detalhes mais constrangedores, à mínima referência a seu nome e, para minha surpresa, absolutamente nada lhe soou estranho. A impressão, inclusive, foi de uma fina dor na confirmação daquelas palavras, no marejamento daqueles olhos e naquele único sorriso, que não foi de um anjo, mas de uma alma ferida por uma estocada, direto no coração, da adaga da amargura.

– E você tem idéia do por quê dessa raiva?

– Não tenho, não. Mas é algo importante, não é?

– Eu já não falo disso há muitos anos. Nesse tempo todo, sempre imaginei que retomar a vida fosse fácil, depois de um duro golpe dado pelo destino. O fato, meu querido, é que os golpes só aumentam de intervalo, mas estão sempre presentes em nossos desígnios, turvando nossa mente e obrigando-nos a trincar nossos risos e enterrar nossos sonhos de felicidade.

Era sem dúvida uma hora difícil para ela, e meio que imaginando algo que pudesse afastá-la de mim a partir daquele momento, senti o meu sangue gelar e a chegada de um medo inapelável incorporou-se às minhas sensações, de modo que fechei os olhos e apenas escutei-a, calmamente.

– Meu amado Vitinho… eu conheci o seu pai muito antes d’ele se casar com a sua mãe. Nós nos amamos muito, mas por uma ironia do destino eu engravidei e tive de sair dessa cidade porque meus pais ficaram inconformados com aquilo. Seu pai nunca me perdoou, embora até hoje não saiba que quando o deixei carregava um filho dele no ventre.

– E onde está ele, agora?

– Infelizmente ele está morto. Ainda bebê, após as complicações do parto, ele não resistiu e os recursos médicos da época não ajudaram. Meu filho morreu aos dois dias de nascido. Se ele estivesse vivo hoje, teria exatamente o dobro da sua idade.

Aquela revelação esclareceu cada ponto nebuloso surgido em minhas indagações internas, e embora ela tivesse divagado por outros assuntos mais amenos, minha mente apenas resgatava aquelas palavras:”(…) os golpes só aumentam de intervalo, mas estão sempre presentes em nossos desígnios(…)”, e por mais que aqueles olhos tristes me chamassem a atenção, eu pensava tão somente na dor daquela mulher, na sua tão contida angústia, embora ninguém pudesse duvidar da alegria que ela sempre nos demonstrava.

Como eu amei aquela mulher! E amei-a muito mais após aquela tarde. Após sentir que apesar de tanta dor, desesperança e eventualmente castigo, seu semblante era do mais sereno amor e enternecimento.

Para minha dor, porém, perdi, naquele instante, minha amada. Ao sair novamente da cidade, dessa vez para não mais voltar, e a exemplo do que ocorrera com meu pai, ela levou consigo, sem perceber, uma parte de mim, a parte que mais me era imprescindível – a alegria de minh’alma.

Tocando agora a janela, onde ao longo dos anos me debrucei, viajo junto daquele meu eu e, planando por um céu imenso, ensaio um contato com Dona Mariana, ícone de meus sonhos e senhora dos meus pensamentos, com quem vivi, cresci e amei, numa vida sem desígnios, sem golpes e sem dores. Numa vida onde ainda era-nos permitido sonhar.

Paul H. Fry on “The Postmodern Psyche”

In Arts & Letters, Books, History, Humanities, Literary Theory & Criticism, Literature, Pedagogy, Philosophy, Postmodernism, Scholarship, Teaching, The Academy, Western Civilization, Western Philosophy on April 1, 2015 at 8:45 am

Below is the next installment in the lecture series on literary theory and criticism by Paul H. Fry.  The previous lectures are here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Paul H. Fry on “Influence”

In Academia, American Literature, Arts & Letters, Books, British Literature, Conservatism, Creativity, Fiction, History, Humanities, Literary Theory & Criticism, Literature, Pedagogy, Philosophy, Scholarship, Teaching, The Academy on March 25, 2015 at 8:45 am

Below is the next installment in the lecture series on literary theory and criticism by Paul H. Fry.  The previous lectures are here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, here, and here.

Of Bees and Boys

In Arts & Letters, Essays, Humanities on March 18, 2015 at 8:45 am

Allen 2

The following essay appeared here in Front Porch Republic.

My brother Brett and I were polite but rambunctious children who made a game of killing bees and dumping their carcasses into buckets of rainwater.  Having heard that bees, like bulls, stirred at the sight of red, we brandished red plastic shovels, sported red t-shirts, and scribbled our faces in red marker.  They were small, these shovels, not longer than arm’s length.  And light, too.  So light, in fact, that we wielded them with ease: as John Henry wielded a hammer or Paul Bunyan an axe.

The bees had a nest somewhere within the rotting wood of our swing set.  Monkey bars made of metal triangles, much like hand percussion instruments, dangled from the wooden frame above; when struck or rattled with a stick, these replied in sharp, loud tones, infuriating the bees, a feisty frontline of which launched from unseen dugouts.

These deployments, though annoying, were easily outmaneuvered: Brett and I swatted them to the ground with our shovelheads.  Mortally wounded, they twitched and convulsed, moving frantically but going nowhere; all except one bee, valiant as he was pathetic, wriggling toward his nearest companion, his maimed posterior dragging in the dirt.  Not much for voyeurism, I relieved him of his misery.  Then Brett and I whacked the littered lot into tiny bee pancakes.

Meanwhile, the defeated community, convening somewhere in the wood, commissioned its combat medics: fat, steady-flying drones that hovered airborne over the dead and then descended, slow and sinking, like flying saucers.  The medics would, when we let them, carry off their dead to an undisclosed location.  I couldn’t watch this disturbingly human ritual, so instead I annihilated the medics, too.  They were easy targets, defenseless.  And they kept coming in battalions of ten or eleven.  As soon as I’d destroy one battalion, another materialized to attend to the new dead.  Unlike the frontliners, the medics didn’t try to sting.  They just came to collect.  But I wouldn’t let them.  Neither would Brett.  Eventually, they quit coming.  That, or we killed them all.

Bees are funny creatures.  Unlike birds, they have two sets of wings.  Most female bees, unlike most female humans Iknow, grow their leg hairs long and their bellies plump—this in order to carry nectar or pollen.  Bee pollination accounts for one-third of the human food supply.  Without bees, then, we might not have our Big Macs or Whoppers—nor, for that matter, honey or flowers.

When I lived in Japan, I had a friend who fancied himself an entomologist.  When he and I tired of talking politics, books, or women, we spoke of insects: I told him weird insect stories, and he explained away the weirdness.  He informed me, for instance, that the bees living in my swing set were probably solitary bees: a gregarious species that stung only in self-defense.  This, you might imagine, was sobering news for an insect murderer.

I asked about the medics that carried away the dead.  Honey bees, he said, discarded their dead for hygienic reasons—to prevent the spread of infection—and they coated their dead in antibacterial waxes.  As for the behavior of my bees, however, he wasn’t sure: maybe they, like honey bees, discarded remains where germs wouldn’t spread.  Or maybe—and he said this facetiously—they conducted funerals.

It wasn’t long before Jared, the boy next door, got in on our bee brutality.  Pregnant with mischief—more so than me or Brett—he decided one day to show us something; shepherding us through the woods, lifting a disarming smile as if to say, “Trust me,” he paused at last, indicated a hole in the ground, and declared, “Thisis it!”

A steady stream of yellow jackets purred in and out of the hole.  He waved his hand to signify the totality of our surroundings and said, “Ours.  All ours.  None for the bees.”

Or something to that effect.

Brett and I nodded in agreement, awaiting instruction.  If we were confused by Jared’s deranged sense of prerogative, we didn’t show it.  Brett found a heavy rock, which I helped him to carry.  We dropped it at Jared’s feet.

Jared summoned forth a mouthful of mucus and hacked it into the hole.  Unfazed, the yellow jackets buzzed in acknowledgment but otherwise ignored the assault.  “These guys are in for hell,” Jared said of the bees, offended at the ineffectuality of his first strike.  He anchored his feet and bent over the rock, which he heaved to his chest and, leaning backwards, rested on his belly; then he staggered a few steps, stopped, and—his face registering another thought—dropped the rock to the ground.

“Spit on it!” he ordered.

Brett and I, obedient friends that we were, doctored the rock in spit.

Then Jared undertook to finish the job he’d begun:  he bent down, lifted the rock, waddled to the hole, straddled the hole, and dropped the rock.  The ground thumped.  A small swirl of dust spiraled into miniature tornadoes that eventually outgrew themselves and became one with the general order of things.

“That’ll do it,” Jared said, clapping his hands together to dry the spit.  The colony, its passage blocked, was trapped both inside and out.  Those un-entombed bees, rather than attack, simply disappeared.

We rejoiced in our victory.  Jared pantomimed conquest, pretending to hold an immense, invisible world Atlas-like over his shoulders.  Brett danced.  I was so busy watching Jared and Brett that I can’t remember what I did.

We didn’t know that yellow jackets engineered nests, tunneled hidden passages and backup exits; nor did we appreciate what the tiny zealots were capable of.

It started with trifling harassment: a slight, circling buzz—reconnaissance probably.  Then I felt the first sting; looking down, I saw a yellow jacket, curled like a question-mark, bearing into my leg.  I spanked it dead.  It looked angry—something in the way it moved.

I heard Brett scream.  Then Jared.  Then saw the ubiquitous cloud of yellow jackets rising in the air, moving as one unit, enveloping us with fatalistic purpose.  My ears filled with the steady drone of thrumming wings.

Then, as happens in moments like this, moments of panic, moments when one feels he’s lost control, feels some other faculty taking over, I submitted to a greater power, which stiffened the muscles of my neck and arms, sent contractions through my calves and thighs, like spasms moving me forward, making me to run, the house, my house, once far away, a small square, growing larger and larger until at last it became a complete, reachable form, the door, my safety, announcing its presence, telling me to hurry, hurry.  Ahead was a fence.  I’d have to jump it.  I measured my strides for the leap, which, miraculously, I achieved with the slight assistance of my palms upon the fence-top.  I found the doorknob, dove into the kitchen, flung off my clothes.  The drone wouldn’t go away.

But where was Brett?  Not here.  Where was he?  Just then came a voice—“Allen!  What in God’s name?!”—and then mom was beside me, horrified, her eyes growing three-times their normal size; and then she was gone again; somehow I was back at the door, looking outside, at the yard, at mom battling the fleet of yellow jackets, at Brett stuck on the fence top, screaming, his face flushed red—red!—his arms leaking blood.  Was that blood?  Or a sore?  I couldn’t tell.

Mom deposited Brett in the kitchen, stripped him naked, called the doctor.  Tweezers.  I remember tweezers.  Yellow jackets were in his ears and mouth.  They were everywhere.  Outside, they continued ramming their bodies into the window.  I looked out.  One hovered there.  It looked at me.  I looked at it.  Insect and Man.  Sizing each other up.

In light of these memories, I can’t help but sense that, no, on account of their characteristics and functions, bees are not the affirmative, happy creatures of some Wordsworthian lyric; that they are too much like us for armistice or reconciliation; that, in fact, we will never see the last of them, as they will never see the last of us.  They will live on, as will we.

Let the boys at them, and they at the boys.  That’s how it ought to be.  So alike are the two that it’s hard to tell who has the advantage of intelligence.  I learned, those many years ago, before the profundity of it all struck me,that wounds can teach the tragic lessons of ignored similarities.  There’s something to be said for that.

If nothing else, I have come to admire bees for their tenacity and courage in the face of insurmountable power.  Theirs is a world of flux,disorder, and death.  Their body is a weapon, one that, once used, terminates everything.

Boys war with bees.  Bees war with boys.  Just another kind of outdoor game, one on a side, except no one can say “Elves.”  Not in this game.

In this game, there is only one ending.  Even in victory, the bees lose.  It takes a man to understand; it might just take bees, or something like them, to make a man.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 7,471 other followers

%d bloggers like this: